Radical Markets - Harberger Tax

harberger-tax
patronage
collectables
radical-markets

#1

This is fascinating!


#2

Two great fundamental articles. I’m going to quote a whole monster bit from the middle because it’s so succinct and so super interesting:

Rare Patrons

Given these concepts/ideas, I want to propose a variant on the usage of radical markets that combines collectibles with such funding schemes. It works as follows:

  • Every musician has a single patron seat.
  • Anyone can buy the patron seat (to become the singular patron & gain the privilege of being the patron).
  • Upon buying it they have to self-assess the value of this seat (being the patron).
  • During the tenure of being a patron, this patron has to pay a percentage fee (say 5%) of the self-assessed seat value per year as their patronage to the musician.
  • At any point in time, someone else can buy this patron seat at this self-assessed value, changing ownership.
  • Upon being “dethroned” as the rare patron for a specific musician, that patron earns a collectible “Post-Patron” badge, signifying that they were a patron at a certain point in history. They just join the “Patrons Club”.
  • They can choose to sell this collectible if they no longer want it.

This combines the game of being a patron, with curation & collecting. Some seats might become more valuable over time as others want to own the right to be the rare patron to a musician. During tenure as the rare patron, the musician earns revenue from this patron. After the tenure, the patron earns a collectible badge that is their proof of patronage. The musician can thus grant privileges to the rare patron & old patrons.

I love this. Would work for open source projects, too! Depending on what one wants, you might have more than one patron seat or tier. It’s both virtualizing AND commodifying sponsorship / patronage!

I realize that there are pieces of this I’ve been thinking about with #boriscoin – I’m heading into 100 “first” holders that I want to give out NFTs for.


#3

Exactly what I was thinking. There is a also a chunk of this UJO article to do with content being creative commons but then if derived works are used for commercial purposes then they end up paying a “tithe” back into the commons which sounds very similar to the new breed of open source licenses which you have been so excited to see come to life, @boris.


#4

Have you ever met Simon de la Rouviere in person, Boris? I know him from my time at ConsenSys.

He is a cool dude. And I should introduce him to Greg Weyl, as well, if he doesn’t already know him.

And hopefully we can ALL meet IRL at DEVCON4.


#5

And Greg is here in Vancouver on October 4th.


#6

Yeah I wasn’t sure if that was public yet. I need to invite Catriona the new ED of BC Blockchain here. She can help with that event.

Haven’t met Simon in person yet. Devcon is going to be a bit of a flurry of overload of IRL meetings.


#7

It isn’t secret - just not fully organized yet.

He is speaking in some non-blockchain context to the economist people at UBC, and then we are trying to get another one, probably on that same day for blockchain kind of folks.

Fun fact - he has been working for Microsoft Research since 2014 and will be spending the rest of his time here at Microsoft with his colleagues and collaborators who are here. What a great job :slight_smile:

(Bob wonders who his Microsoft colleagues in Vancouver are and whether we should be talking to them!)

Principal Researcher - Research on how to expand the scope of the market beyond the traditional limits of property, democracy and borders.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/e-glen-weyl-7007957a/